Pool Chemical Descriptions

pH Increaser

Used to raise pH. The Scientific name is Sodium Carbonate. Sodium Carbonate is typically packaged and sold as "pH Increaser," "pH Up," or "pH Plus." Sodium Carbonate is granular. Read the instructions on the label to determine the amount to add, how it must be added (either diluted in water or broadcast straight from the container), a maximum amount (per 10,000 gallons of water) that can be added at one time, and other precautions.

Alkalinity Increaser

Used to raise Alkalinity. The scientific name is Sodium Bicarbonate. Sodium Bicarbonate is typically packaged and sold as "Alkalinity Increaser," "Alkalinity Up," or "Alkalinity Plus." Sodium Bicarbonate is granular. Read the instructions on the label to determine the amount to add, how it must be added (either diluted in water or broadcast straight from the container), a maximum amount (per 10,000 gallons of water) that can be added at one time, and other precautions.

Muriatic Acid

An alternative to lower pH and Alkalinity. Muriatic acid is in liquid form. Read the instructions on the label to determine the amount to add, how it must be added (either diluted in water or poured straight from the bottle), a maximum amount (per 10,000 gallons of water) that can be added at one time, and other precautions. Be extra careful when handling muriatic acid.

Shock

Shocking a pool is mandatory with chlorine, bromine, or any other alternative. As a pool owner, you will become familiar with shocking your pool. Shock is a granular compound. If you use chlorine, you will want to predominantly use a chlorine-based shock (such as Calcium Hypochlorite or Lithium Hypochlorite). But, you can supplement your shock schedule with a non-chlorine shock periodically. If you use bromine, you will want to predominantly use a non-chlorine shock (such as Potassium Peroxymonosulfate). But, you can supplement your shock schedule with a chlorine-based shock periodically. If you use an alternative to chlorine (or bromine), then check with the pool professionals that sold you the alternative to assure that you are using the appropriate type of shock. There is controversy in the industry as to how often you should shock your pool-some say weekly, some say twice per month, some say monthly, and some say only as needed. We will analyze this controversial topic in detail in poolmanual.com. Read the instructions on the label for all pertinent application information.

Bromine

An alternative to chlorine that pool owners use to kill bacteria, living organisms, ammonia, and any other contaminates (such as dirt, debris, or algae spores) that are in pool water. Bromine does come in granular form, but by far, the most common form of bromine is the tablet. The main reason that bromine is not chosen as often as chlorine in pools is that it is fairly expensive. Bromine's niche is with spas (hot tubs), as it is more stable than chlorine in the hotter water temperatures that are associated with spa use.

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